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Exhibitions
Weaving Together:
A Celebration of Métis Sashes
This exhibition featured 12 sashes, created by Métis community members across BC through the Ministry of Culture, Heritage and Language's Sash Weaving Workshop Series. The series was taught by Métis weaver Kalyn Kodiak. Over the span of 7 sessions, participants learned how to weave their own sashes on a loom. Participants were encouraged to choose sash colours that were meaningful to them. We are excited to showcase the beautiful talent of the workshop participants. across BC through the Ministry of Culture, Heritage and Language's Sash Weaving Workshop Series. The series was taught by Métis weaver Kalyn Kodiak. Over the span of 7 sessions, participants learned how to weave their own sashes on a loom. Participants were encouraged to choose sash colours that were meaningful to them. We are excited to showcase the beautiful talent of the workshop participants.

Artists featured (in alphabetical order): Carleigh Gainer, Carly Nabess, Carrie Gabriele, Corinne Thunderchild, Courtney Pelletier, Erin Barisoff-Harris, Jessica Johnson, Madelaine MacIvor, Mallory Blondeau, Pam Goldsack, Ren Jager, Shaylee LaFontaine, Virginia Lee, Yvonne Christensen.

We would like to give our thanks to Kalyn Kodiak for sharing her knowledge of sash weaving with us in the Sash Weaving Series and for making this exhibition possible. Maarsii!
More About Sashes
Métis people are well known for their colourful woven sashes. The ceinture fléchée or Assomption (arrow) sash is a traditional piece of French clothing that became an essential item and tool worn by fur traders. Over time, Métis people adopted the sash as a symbol of Métis identity.

In addition to being an identity marker, Métis people used sashes for many practical purposes - including as a belt, scarf, sling, bandage, washcloth, saddle blanket, trail marker, rope, calendar system, and as a marker of one's kill in a buffalo hunt.

The original Métis sashes were finger-woven, a style of braiding. Each sash would have been between 32 and 42 strands and would take 70 - 300 hours to complete, depending on the pattern and experience of the weaver. In time, sash makers switched to looms, which proved to be a more efficient process.

Despite the majority of sashes that are made today being manufactured by machines, there are still Métis weavers who practice the beautiful art of sash making by hand and by loom. Moreover, while red is the most iconic colour of the Métis sashes, many Métis people and communities today are creating their own sashes with unique colours and designs.*
*Information used in this writeup was adapted from MNBC's Kaa-Wiichihitoyaahk: Métis Perspectives on Cultural Wellness, 2020. *Information used in this writeup was adapted from MNBC's Kaa-Wiichihitoyaahk: Métis Perspectives on Cultural Wellness, 2020.
Banner Image: Carrie Gabriele, 2023.